Chesapeake Bay Introduced Species Database


Rosa multiflora

Common name(s):
Multiflora Rose
"The world is a rose, smell it and pass it to your friends" so goes a Persian proverb. The fragrant Multiflora Rose, like most roses, is native to Asia, and like the proverb suggests, this rose has been passed around. It was introduced to the United States as an ornamental plant in the 1800s, and in the mid-20th century it was promoted by the United States Department of Agriculture Soil Conservation Service to prevent soil erosion. At that time, it was considered a great plant to introduce because it not only prevented soil erosion, but was beautiful and thought to be good for wildlife. It was initially planted in the Chesapeake Bay watershed for erosion protection and as an attractive living fence. Unfortunately, like many other introductions that seemed great at the time, it soon became a serious pest throughout the US, including the Chesapeake watershed where it is now regarded as a serious invader. It is an upland plant, but occasionally occurs at the edge of tidal wetlands.
Image courtesy of Paul Fofonoff.

Taxonomy:

Kingdom
Phylum
Class
Order
Family
Genus
Species
Plantae
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliopsida
Rosales
Rosaceae
Rosa
Rosa multiflora


Synonymy:

Rosa cathayensis


Potentially Misidentified As:



Common Names:

Multiflora Rose


Comments:



This data was last modified on Wednesday, July 17th, 2013.
Databases Overview| Chesapeake Bay |